↠´ Read ↠´ Does Altruism Exist? by David Sloan Wilson ë 11th-century.co

↠´ Read ↠´ Does Altruism Exist? by David Sloan Wilson ë Almost 5 star territory Big idea book Wilson has long been one of the primary advocates for group level selection Here he lays out how altruism, which is hard to explain in standard evolutionary theory, can be explained as the result of multi level selection the new terminology for group level selection without any intent of altruism Wilson walks through an example with simple arithmetic of how a group withaltruisists can outcompete a group of selfish individuals and thus fosteraltruists in the entire population Some of the rationale is difficult Wilson does a pretty good job of explaining it, but it was tedious at points I got bogged down momentarily, but the big idea kept my ploughing my way through T It was a very enjoyable and invigorating read The first half of the book was difficult to navigate, but with time and effort most of the essential machinery and arguments developed there made the second half of the book which looked at altruism in different situations very intriguing This book makes me want to readinto the subject which I believe is one of the objectives of the book Looking forward to reading the references listed to gaininsights to supplement what I have already gained in this book.
read this for a review journal and was pleasantly surprised as the subject matter was not on my list of interest After reading the book, would like to read Wilson s other book, Darwin s Cathedral as I think his writing style is accessible to the layperson and reads well, not dry I found the economics chapter rather interesting, esp his thoughts on Wall Street and Ayn Rand If you are on the fence, read it, interesting and painless.
The answer to this question is a definitive yes, but not surprisingly needs anuanced response when digging into the motivations and context of altruistic decisions Selfishness beats altruism within groups Altruistic groups beat selfish groups Everything else is commentary Evolutionary biologist David Sloan Wilson wrote this as a summary of sociobiology in a different article, but could have been the description of this book too He makes the case that action versus feelings, distal environmental factors vs proximate physical basis , or the number of other prosocial folks around are additional factors that should be used to determine the deeper reasons of altruistic acts.
Almost 5 star territory Big idea book Wilson has long been one of the primary advocates for group level selection Here he lays out how altruism, which is hard to explain in standard evolutionary theory, can be explained as the result of multi level selection the new terminology for group level selection without any intent of altruism Wilson walks through an example with simple arithmetic of how a group withaltruisists can outcompete a group of selfish individuals and thus fosteraltruists in the entire population Some of the rationale is difficult Wilson does a pretty good job of explaining it, but it was tedious at points I got bogged down momentarily, but the big idea kept my ploughing my way through T It was a very enjoyable and invigorating read The first half of the book was difficult to navigate, but with time and effort most of the essential machinery and arguments developed there made the second half of the book which looked at altruism in different situations very intriguing This book makes me want to readinto the subject which I believe is one of the objectives of the book Looking forward to reading the references listed to gaininsights to supplement what I have already gained in this book.
read this for a review journal and was pleasantly surprised as the subject matter was not on my list of interest After reading the book, would like to read Wilson s other book, Darwin s Cathedral as I think his writing style is accessible to the layperson and reads well, not dry I found the economics chapter rather interesting, esp his thoughts on Wall Street and Ayn Rand If you are on the fence, read it, interesting and painless.
The answer to this question is a definitive yes, but not surprisingly needs anuanced response when digging into the motivations and context of altruistic decisions Selfishness beats altruism within groups Altruistic groups beat selfish groups Everything else is commentary Evolutionary biologist David Sloan Wilson wrote this as a summary of sociobiology in a different article, but could have been the description of this book too He makes the case that action versus feelings, distal environmental factors vs proximate physical basis , or the number of other prosocial folks around are additional factors that should be used to determine the deeper reasons of altruistic acts.
What can evolution teach us about crafting social policy When we think of evolution and public policy, sometimes we think of the social darwinism that arose in the late 19th century and still dominates a fair amount of policy thinking today But social darwinism is pretty maladaptive from a societal perspective David Sloan Wilson explores the role that altruistic actions in consequence,than intent purely altruistic intent is something that, as he points out, almost never appears in culture or religion are an essential part of group cohesion Cooperation, he argues, is a key part of what differentiates us as a species Alone among primate species, we crossed the threshold from groups of organisms to groups as very detailed and after reading this book, it made me want to bepro society,, faith in humanity restored A Powerful Treatise That Demonstrates The Existence Of Altruism In Nature, With Surprising Implications For Human Society Does Altruism Exist Or Is Human Nature Entirely Selfish In This Eloquent And Accessible Book, Famed Biologist David Sloan Wilson Provides New Answers To This Age Old Question Based On The Latest Developments In Evolutionary Science From An Evolutionary Viewpoint, Wilson Argues, Altruism Is Inextricably Linked To The Functional Organization Of Groups Groups That Work Undeniably Exist In Nature And Human Society, Although Special Conditions Are Required For Their Evolution Humans Are One Of The Most Groupish Species On Earth, In Some Ways Comparable To Social Insect Colonies And Multi Cellular Organisms The Case That Altruism Evolves In All Social Species Is Surprisingly Simple To Make Yet The Implications For Human Society Are Far From Obvious Some Of The Most Venerable Criteria For Defining Altruism Aren T Worth Caring Much About, Any Than We Care Much Whether We Are Paid By Cash Or Check Altruism Defined In Terms Of Thoughts And Feelings Is Notably Absent From Religion, Even Though Altruism Defined In Terms Of Action Is Notably Present The Economic Case For Selfishness Can Be Decisively Rejected The Quality Of Everyday Life Depends Critically On People Who Overtly Care About The Welfare Of Others Yet, Like Any Other Adaptation, Altruism Can Have Pathological Manifestations Wilson Concludes By Showing How A Social Theory That Goes Beyond Altruism By Focusing On Group Function Can Help To Improve The Human Condition Wow Where to even begin with this book, it s actually one of the most straight forward, succinct explanations of the evolutionary foundation for altruism I could have expected, with just enough depth to secure understanding by the reader but not overload them with evolutionary jargon and a plethora ofresources that need to be investigated to satisfy said understanding I think it has greatly sharpened my ability to explicate my own worldview.
The seemingly obvious distinction between altruism defined at the level of action and psychology based altruism, defined at the level of thoughts and feelings , is so critical to consider when thinking about the pragmatics of altruism within a society Because the latter is so much less transparent when it comes to empirical research, it s often in our best interest to maintain our focus how altruism manifests itself in a way Wilson uses this short, rambling book to extend his position that the group selection debate is settled, suggesting it s time to get on with revisiting topics such as altruism through the lens of multilevel selection theory Wilson recounts the growing scientific consensus on his core question to confirm that, Spoiler Alert, altruism exists This isn t news exactly in a 2007 paper Wilson and EO Wilson concluded that Selfishness beats altruism within groups Altruistic groups beat selfish groups Everything else is commentary Apparently,commentary is necessary because DS Wilson continues to beat the drum.
Although Wilson states his book is intended for all audiences, it is loaded with concepts and terminology that demand some prior knowledge He also assumes interest in the 50 year academic controversy about The answer to the title s question is, unsurprisingly, yes , but the argument supporting the answer is certainly not trivial Wilson arrives at the answer only after careful analysis, e.
g by making a distinction between altruism in action and altruism in thought The book is based on the notion of group selection in evolution, a concept recently rehabilitated by, among others, the author himself Group selection, orgenerally, multi level selection, can occur under fairly well defined circumstances, overriding or modifying ordinary individual selection Rather than disproving the selfish gene theory, Wilson clarifies why and how that theory is not and cannot be the whole answer.
Wilson also ventures into the arena of politics and philosophy, which is a dangerous thing for biologists, and evolutionists in particular, to do But he pulls it off admirably The discussion center



very detailed and after reading this book, it made me want to bepro society,, faith in humanity restored What can evolution teach us about crafting social policy When we think of evolution and public policy, sometimes we think of the social darwinism that arose in the late 19th century and still dominates a fair amount of policy thinking today But social darwinism is pretty maladaptive from a societal perspective David Sloan Wilson explores the role that altruistic actions in consequence,than intent purely altruistic intent is something that, as he points out, almost never appears in culture or religion are an essential part of group cohesion Cooperation, he argues, is a key part of what differentiates us as a species Alone among primate species, we crossed the threshold from groups of organisms to groups as Wow Where to even begin with this book, it s actually one of the most straight forward, succinct explanations of the evolutionary foundation for altruism I could have expected, with just enough depth to secure understanding by the reader but not overload them with evolutionary jargon and a plethora ofresources that need to be investigated to satisfy said understanding I think it has greatly sharpened my ability to explicate my own worldview.
The seemingly obvious distinction between altruism defined at the level of action and psychology based altruism, defined at the level of thoughts and feelings , is so critical to consider when thinking about the pragmatics of altruism within a society Because the latter is so much less transparent when it comes to empirical research, it s often in our best interest to maintain our focus how altruism manifests itself in a way Wilson uses this short, rambling book to extend his position that the group selection debate is settled, suggesting it s time to get on with revisiting topics such as altruism through the lens of multilevel selection theory Wilson recounts the growing scientific consensus on his core question to confirm that, Spoiler Alert, altruism exists This isn t news exactly in a 2007 paper Wilson and EO Wilson concluded that Selfishness beats altruism within groups Altruistic groups beat selfish groups Everything else is commentary Apparently,commentary is necessary because DS Wilson continues to beat the drum.
Although Wilson states his book is intended for all audiences, it is loaded with concepts and terminology that demand some prior knowledge He also assumes interest in the 50 year academic controversy about The answer to the title s question is, unsurprisingly, yes , but the argument supporting the answer is certainly not trivial Wilson arrives at the answer only after careful analysis, e.
g by making a distinction between altruism in action and altruism in thought The book is based on the notion of group selection in evolution, a concept recently rehabilitated by, among others, the author himself Group selection, orgenerally, multi level selection, can occur under fairly well defined circumstances, overriding or modifying ordinary individual selection Rather than disproving the selfish gene theory, Wilson clarifies why and how that theory is not and cannot be the whole answer.
Wilson also ventures into the arena of politics and philosophy, which is a dangerous thing for biologists, and evolutionists in particular, to do But he pulls it off admirably The discussion center

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